The Business Design Process and Making the Most of It

THE DESIGN PROCESS

The design process should be handled like any other business process. The key is to get everyone together who is involved, from designers to employees to make sure everyone understands the project requirements, ensuring that your use of design provides the outcomes you need well within your project budget.

Key tips for managing the design process

The design process should start by identifying the purpose and goal of the project, like increasing brand awareness or enhancing a product offering.

Perform research both before and during the project as it helps keep focus on what your customers want.

Determine who in your company will be responsible for the design process

Set a budget and a timetable with assessable targets.

Select your designer and create a design brief outlining the project’s budget, timetable, goals, and any other pertinent information on developing the design. Consult with whomever you need to when drawing it up.

Ensure that your marketing, sales, and production departments are ready for any new product, branding, or service you develop.

MAXIMIZE THE SUCCESS OF YOUR DESIGN PROJECTS

For every design project you manage, you must set distinct objectives for calculating its success.

In many instances customer responses will be a critical factor. For example, if you design a new website interface, the main benchmark of its success will be its performance in the market.

You may also want to think about a vast range of other aspects when considering the success of your project:

  • Cost – did parts of the design process go over budget? If so, why?
  • Timetables – if deadlines were missed, was it because they were impractical or were the delays avoidable?
  • Working relationships – did bad communication or other problems stop cooperation between you and your designer?

If issues come up, handle them as fast as possible. Revise the design brief if crucial new information or priorities emerge. Try not to get locked into a project that won’t deliver what you need.

Once a design project is finished, review it to see what experiences can be used as learning tools. This makes it easier to guarantee success on future projects.